Level: Challenging

Distance: 9½ km r/t

Time: 6 h r/t Elev. Change: 640 m

Topographical Map: Squamish 92G/11

Click to View Map

Season: April to Nov

Access: See Getting to Whistler

Take the bus as far as Murrin Provincial Park, a popular picnic and swimming area at the edge of Highway 99. Trout fishing in well-stocked Browning Lake is also possible but since a highway runs by it pack your fly rod into Petgill Lake for a more tranquil experience. You'll easily find the trailhead just beyond the park in the direction of Squamish and Whistler. From the highway the well-defined trail begins climbing straight up to a series of viewpoints overlooking Howe Sound.

As you move away from the noisy transportation corridor the trail widens into a disused logging road which continues first eastward over fairly level ground then turns southward before abruptly swerving eastward on to a narrow footpath once again. Continue climbing over the shoulder that leads up to Goat Ridge before dropping down to Petgill Lake at 610 m elevation. The route on to Goat Ridge itself is much more demanding and may be better left for another day. To complete the circuit of Petgill Lake should take 30 - 40 minutes before retracing your steps back to Murrin Park. While waiting for the return bus be sure to check out the rock climbers who like to practice their bouldering skills on the rocky bluffs adjacent to Browning Lake.

The End


Sea Asparagus

Sea Asparagus

This salty delicacy will be found wherever sea kayakers lurk. Carpeting the water’s edge on mud flats, sheltered coves and estuaries, sea asparagus prefers limited exposure to wave action. Sea asparagus has more aliases than its segmented stems have branches, being known variously as glasswort, pickleweed, samphire and pigeon foot. In the camp kitchen sea asparagus is versatile. Stems can be munched upon as is, used to perk up salads, presented like asparagus or even collected for pickling or freezing. A British Columbia company has developed a market for sea asparagus, shipping the frozen product to upscale restaurants worldwide. Soak sea asparagus in freshwater for several hours before preparing to reduce its salinity.

Illustration by Manami Kimura