Level: Moderate

Distance: 32 km

Time: 6 hr

Warning: Marine Traffic

Marine Chart: 3526

Tide Table: Squamish

Starting from either of Bowen Island Sea Kayaking's two locations at Snug Cove or Tunstall Bay will do if you decide to paddle around Bowen Island itself. Let wind and current direction dictate whether you take the Island in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. Allow plenty of time if you plan to circle the whole island. Two alternate routes are possible. The northern route from Snug Cove to Tunstall Bay is 18 km while the southern route is a mere 14 km. You may wish to spend a few extra hours exploring the group of small islands [Paisley, Hermit, Mickey, etc.] off the southwestern tip of Bowen.

Stay close to shore in the busy Queen Charlotte Channel and be prepared to encounter frequent large wakes from passing BC Ferries south from Snug Cove as far west as Collingwood Channel. Moreover the southern end of Bowen faces on the open Georgia Strait and is sometimes subject to heavy northerly seas. Steep cliffs and a sparsity of beaches further complicate the southern passage during inclement weather.

The northern and western shores are exposed to the aforementioned squamish winds as well as the infrequent wakes of ferries plying the Sechelt-Horseshoe Bay route. Luckily numerous small rocky beaches provides a modicum of shelter in the event of heavy swells. There are no beaches suited to camping on Bowen Island.

If lacking confidence at the approach of large boat wakes turn to take the waves head on and you'll easily ride out their passage. As your experience grows you'll discover that sea kayaks are extremely seaworthy craft capable of handling just about anything the sea can throw at them. Technology is not the problem. Paddlers' ability and confidence are more important factors in determining what kind of weather conditions to attempt. The key to safe kayaking is to know your limits and never exceed them.

The End


Rose Hips

Wild Rose

This budding celebrity is popular enough to have been immortalized on license plates in four American states and one Canadian province, Alberta. Even before the Euro-invasion wild roses and their fruit, called "hips," were a mainstay in the medicine chests of nearly every nation on the continent. Whether a cure-all or just sound nutrition, rose hips are indeed generously endowed with vitamin C as well as beta-carotene, vitamins E, B and K. While rose hips are widely available as commercial herbal teas and jams, the tough outer rind can be chewed as is at trailside. Just peel and separate from the seeds, prior to chomping. Add wild rose petals to outback salad for both colour and delicate flavour.

Illustration by Manami Kimura