The closest commercial rafting tours can be found on the Chilliwack River just one hour from Vancouver. And while the Chilliwack River suffers from a relatively short season it makes up for it in bumps, grinds and pure white water excitement. Dropping at a rate of 7 metres per kilometre, the Chilliwack is known for seemingly endless stretches of froth and foam.

The Tamahi Rapids in particular are home of the annual Canadian Kayaking Championships. The Chilliwack River is rated at between class iii & iv and rocks n' rolls through high water season from May to the end of July. During that time consumer-savvy Hyak Wilderness Adventures operates a daily shuttle service from downtown Vancouver. Pick up at 8 AM can be arranged from any major hotel. Hyak's Chilliwack River paddle-rafting tour lasts 4½ hours and includes a riverside feast. As an added touch participants can warm up at the end of the day with hot showers before returning to the city.

The End


Dentalia

Dentalia Shells

These thin, tubular mollusks formed the currency of commerce throughout the Pacific Northwest as long as 3000 years ago. Pre-European civilization is often considered a barter economy, with, for instance, coastal tribes swapping oolichan grease directly for prized Oregon obsidian. Commodity traders, however, could rely on this wampum to close a transaction when interest in the goods was decidedly one-sided. Called hykwa in Chinook jargon, dentalia shells possessed all the necessary attributes of money, being portable, recognizable and durable but rare and desirable enough to foster trade. Being available in a variety of sizes, the tusk-like shells were even divisible into small change. Professional traders are known to have tattooed measuring lines on their forearms as a handy calculator of individual shell values. Only a handful of groups, including the Nuu-chah-nulth in the vicinity of Tofino, possessed dentalia in quantities sufficient enough to make them wealthy. Harvesting the deep water mollusks was no easy undertaking however. From a dugout canoe a long, broom-like apparatus was thrust straight down into the muddy sea bottom then retrieved. With any luck a shell or two would be trapped amongst the stiff twigs at the end of the handle. Dentalia were also ostentatiously displayed as symbols of wealth and power in the form of body adornments. Perhaps most recognizable are the breast plates invariably worn by cheesy Hollywood Indians.

Illustration by Manami Kimura