Level: Easy

Distance: 8 km

Time: 2 h

Elevation Change: 180 m

Season: Year Round

Topographical Map: 92 B/14

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Access: At the head of Whaler Bay about two km from the Sturdies Bay ferry terminal you'll find the trailhead on the left side of the road.

An old overgrown logging road here leads to 130 hectare Bluffs Park. Within a few minutes the trail branches to the left. Though unmarked, this is the route to Bluffs Park. The newer-looking main trail parallels Sturdies Bay Road as far as the 2 grocery stores on Georgeson Bay Road. Follow the forested trail 2 km to reach Bluff Road. A few minutes up the road you'll find the parking area from which a trail leads to the summit. The view overlooks Active Pass and Navy Channel with North Pender Island in the distance on the right. Mayne Island is across the channel on the left. Bluffs Park was created in 1948, made possible by a generous land donation by the Belgian farming family who settled the land. To loop back to the ferry terminal return via Bluff Road to Burrill Road (2 km) then on to Sturdies Bay Road (2 km). The ferry terminal is just a kilometre down the hill.

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Labrador Tea

Labrador Tea

Forgot the tea bags and dying for a cuppa? Look around the camp. Chances are your drippy socks are draped over a Labrador tea bush. Steep the leaves, but not the socks, in boiled water for a tea that was enjoyed by more North American Indians than any other kind. Don’t actually boil the leaves however as boiling releases a chemical called ledol which has a number of unpleasant side effects. Pregnant women should avoid Labrador tea altogether. As a mild narcotic, Labrador tea was also an essential ingredient in kinnikinnik, a tobacco-less smoking mixture used by native groups throughout much of North America.

Illustration by Manami Kimura