Access: From downtown Vancouver hop a #210 Upper Lynn Valley bus from Dunsmuir Street next to Burrard SkyTrain station. Stay on the bus to the end of the line at the corner of Evelyn & Underwood Streets. The bus trip should take around 45 minutes. Take the short-cut east past two tennis courts and continue half a block to the corner of Dempsey and Lynn Valley Roads. From there you'll see the park entrance to the north. Follow Intake Road for about a kilometre before reaching the park proper.

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Those in North or West Vancouver can take the #228 Lynn Valley bus from Lonsdale Quay to the corner of Dempsey and Lynn Valley Roads.

Formerly the source of drinking water for the city of North Vancouver, Lynn Headwaters Regional Park was opened to the public when floods damaged water intakes in 1983. Hiking is by far the main attraction here with trails suited to all levels of experience and ability.

Be sure to top up your water at the picnic area as most of the water you'll meet up with while hiking has been polluted by people and their dogs. From the picnic area cross the bridge to access the trails of 4,685-hectare Lynn Headwaters Regional Park. An information board here provides hikers with background information on the park, directions, maps, trail conditions and common sense safety information.

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Warm weather causes toxic plankton to bloom all over the coast of British Columbia whether a month has an "R" in it or not. If you are not absolutely sure that the shellfish you are about to eat is safe then don’t eat it. Bivalve molluscs like oysters, clams and mussels are all susceptible to red tide. Butter clams are the very worst, retaining toxins for long periods of time. Cooking does not alter the toxicity of these filter feeders in any way.

If you are going to an area where shellfish harvesting might be possible then make it a habit to call the federal government’s online Red Tide advisory. As with so many  government services this one too is needlessly confusing. Where appropriate, I have included Fisheries Management Area numbers with each trip description. Armed with that information, navigating the Fisheries and Oceans Canada's online list of Bivalve Shellfish Contamination Closures is much simpler. On the same site there's a slow-loading map detailing closures as well.

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Notable Quotes

...here is a wonderful collection of 94 outdoor adventures you can enjoy using public transportation.

-- the Common Reader; Common Ground Magazine