Route:

Distance:

Time:

Level:

Elev Change:

Season:

Falls Bottom

2 km

45 min r/t

Easy

75 m

Year Round

Falls Top

4 km

1½ h r/t

Moderate

385 m

March to Nov

 

Access: See Getting to Whistler

Topographical Map: Squamish 92G/11

From the trailhead described above two additional routes lead to 335 metre-high Shannon Falls where tour bus after tour bus drops off its cargo of flash happy visitors. The first trail is just a single kilometre long and, after crossing Olesen Creek, leads to the bottom of the falls where most of the shutter bugs congregate. The second footpath also crosses the creek, just before the fork leading to the Stawamus Chief's first and second peaks. Continue climbing steeply to the top of the cascade 1½ km away. Very few of the bus-bound ever make it this far.

The End


Salal

Salal

Though not a popular trail-side snack in modern times, salal berries are not only edible, they are quite tasty. Perhaps the "hairiness" of the berries or the grainy texture imparted by their many, tiny seeds is a turnoff to jaded modern palettes. Being plentiful throughout the coast, salal berries were an important component of pre-European diets hereabouts. Aboriginal groups generally consumed salal berries directly from the bush or processed them into a kind of fruit leather for storage. These cakes were then reconstituted with water and served mixed with the omnipresent oolichan grease. An acquired taste, no doubt. The deep purple colouring of the berries found use in dying baskets. Salal berries are presently used primarily in jams and pies. The bright, leathery foliage is commercially harvested for use in floral displays world-wide.

Illustration by Manami Kimura