Level: Challenging

Distance: 9½ km r/t

Time: 6 h r/t Elev. Change: 640 m

Topographical Map: Squamish 92G/11

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Season: April to Nov

Access: See Getting to Whistler

Take the bus as far as Murrin Provincial Park, a popular picnic and swimming area at the edge of Highway 99. Trout fishing in well-stocked Browning Lake is also possible but since a highway runs by it pack your fly rod into Petgill Lake for a more tranquil experience. You'll easily find the trailhead just beyond the park in the direction of Squamish and Whistler. From the highway the well-defined trail begins climbing straight up to a series of viewpoints overlooking Howe Sound.

As you move away from the noisy transportation corridor the trail widens into a disused logging road which continues first eastward over fairly level ground then turns southward before abruptly swerving eastward on to a narrow footpath once again. Continue climbing over the shoulder that leads up to Goat Ridge before dropping down to Petgill Lake at 610 m elevation. The route on to Goat Ridge itself is much more demanding and may be better left for another day. To complete the circuit of Petgill Lake should take 30 - 40 minutes before retracing your steps back to Murrin Park. While waiting for the return bus be sure to check out the rock climbers who like to practice their bouldering skills on the rocky bluffs adjacent to Browning Lake.

The End


Nodding Onion

Nodding Onion

Packing fresh veggies along on the trail may be impractical due to weight or time considerations. Widely-available nodding onion imparts a welcomed taste of green to almost any dish except granola perhaps. Both white bulb and green stalk can be used like green onions or chives. Rubbing the crushed bulbs on exposed skin is said to keep mosquitoes, black flies and maybe even your traveling companions away. Nodding onion is commonly available throughout the province though toxic death camas looks deceptively similar to nodding onion to the uninitiated. To verify, crush a bit of the plant. Only the edible species gives off an unmistakable onion smell.

Illustration by Manami Kimura