Level: Moderate

Distance: 7.2 km

Time: 4 h

Elevation Change: 275 m

Season: Year Round

Topographical Map: 92 G/6 & 92 G/7

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Access: Take the #210 Upper Lynn Valley from Dunsmuir Street next to Burrard SkyTrain station to Phibbs Exchange. Change to the #214 Blueridge bus to Hyannis Drive. Walk west past Berkley Avenue to the trailhead on your right.

After climbing at a moderate pace for 2.3 km, you'll reach Mount Seymour Provincial Park where the terrain begins its descent towards Deep Cove 4.9 km to the east. On the way you'll pass a branch leading up to the historic Mushroom Parking Lot. Just fifteen minutes out of the way, you'll be rewarded by great views of the lower mainland from the picnic area. Consider returning to the Baden-Powell trail in a loop via the Old Buck Access Trail and a short segment of the Old Buck Trail itself. The detour avoids backtracking while adding only 10 minutes to your hike.

For those wishing to bail out at Mount Seymour Road hourly bus service is 2 km down the hill near the park headquarters on Indian River Road. The #215 bus will take you to Phibbs Exchange where you have to transfer to the #210 Vancouver bus. Continuing eastward through the park you'll soon come to Indian River Road which you'll have to follow a short distance to a power line right-of-way. From here the trail will soon lead south to a rocky bluff with magnificent views of Indian Arm and Deep Cove. The final leg of the Baden-Powell trail cuts back west again through a short but extremely pretty section of lush west coast rain forest. Turn right at the end of the trail and then left on the next street. The charming community of Deep Cove offers enough of the usual tourist treats to satisfy even the hungriest hikers. At the foot of Gallant Street pick up either the #211 or #212 bus to Phibbs Exchange. A quick change to the #210 Vancouver bus will take you downtown.

The End


Cattails

Cattails

A veritable supermarket on a stick, cattails were once a source of sustenance as well as comfort to Pacific Northwest natives. Young shoots can be eaten as greens in the spring while young flower spikes can be roasted and eaten like cobs of corn. Young roots or rhizomes (underground stems) can be peeled and eaten as is—sashimi-style, hold the wasabi—or dried and pulverized into flour. Early settlers too discovered that cattail pollen could be harvested and added to bread or pancakes. Cattail down or fluff was collected in autumn for use as a wound dressing or for stuffing pillows and bedding. Cattail leaves found use in native basketry.

Illustration by Manami Kimura