Access: Getting to Lynn Headwaters

Level: Demanding

Distance: 9½ km r/t

Time: 4 h

Elevation Change: 760 m

Season: May to Nov

Topographical Map: Vancouver N 92/G6

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For access to Lynn Peak follow the gravel road to the right from the information board, turning abruptly left on to Lynn Loop Trail after 10 minutes or so.

This pleasant forest footpath branches after another 20 minutes. The right fork to 825-metre Lynn Peak is well marked, sloping upwards gently enough at first. Soon however you'll begin mounting a series of switchbacks that zig and zag and zig again for 45 minutes up to a small south-facing break in the trees. Linger not, however, as the best is yet to come.

Deep Dusk: Not easy to see the forest for the trees as these three crowns poke out of the shadows, catching a few final rays of the evening sun.            

Continue climbing at a more relaxed pace for another 30 minutes and an opening known as the Blimp Lookout reveals views to the east of Mount Seymour. Catch your breath here but save your lunch as a further 30 minutes of climbing will put you on top where you may wish to linger, taking in the panorama encompassing Mount Elsay and Mount Seymour to the east and, on a clear day, Mt. Baker, that massive volcano to the south east in Washington state. When you have had enough of unsurpassed scenery and fresh air retrace your steps back down to the trailhead.

The End


Stinging Nettle

Stinging Needles

Roll in a patch of stinging nettle and you’ll think it’s a spelling mistake. Nettle’s stinging needles, as whispy as whiskers, are hollow and filled with formic acid which can cause burning, even blistering. Though aboriginal medicinal uses were various the principle technological use was as a source of hemp-like fiber for making thread and string. Stalks were picked late in the year when prickles had largely dropped off. Fibers were separated by rubbing or beating and then spun into thin threads. Those in turn could be braided to form thicker, stronger twine for weaving fine cloth, making fish nets and fishing line and, rarely, string bikinis.

Illustration by Manami Kimura