Access: Getting to Lynn Headwaters

Level: Easy

Distance: 5.7 km r/t

Time: 2½ h

Elevation Change: 250 m

Topographical Map: 92 G/6

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Season: April to Nov

At 5.7 km, Lynn Loop is slightly longer and a somewhat steeper than the former stroll. In order to avoid climbing the switchback sections at the top end of the trail it is recommended that you complete the trail in a counter-clockwise direction. If so, expect the first half of the hike to wind through a mature, second generation forest while the return trip is more open, following the banks of Lynn Creek. Pause a moment to cool your toes here: but remember your toes and everyone else's have rendered the water undrinkable.

bear sign

Be Bear Aware: Lynn Headwaters is home -- you are the invasive species -- to both black bears and cougars. Neither wants an encounter with that nasty species, homo sapiens. Be alert at all times, travel as a group and possess foreknowledge of how to react when encountering these magnificent creatures on their own turf.   

Lynn Loop Trail begins a short distance to the right [south-east] of the bridge. Watch for directional signs on the left of the road towards Rice Lake. The first half of the trail follows the high ground along a bench well above Lynn Creek. The first junction you'll encounter leads up to Lynn Peak. Take the left fork instead for a short distance until you see another side trail veering off to the right. A few minutes along this track leads to a couple of glacial erratics, giant boulders deposited by receding glaciers at the end of the last ice age. Back on the main trail you'll reach a major junction at the 3.1 km mark. Note the massive, upside-down cedar stump here. To return to where you started take the left fork 0.7 km down through a series of steep switchbacks. At the bottom you'll take a left again following Lynn Creek downstream for 1.7 km of easy hiking.

An alternative route continues along the bench land for an additional 2.4 km to the debris chute at the start of the trail to Norvan Falls and on to Grouse Mountain. Though, considerably longer, you'll drop down to Lynn Creek at a much more gradual pace. From the debris chute double back along the Cedars Mill Trail for 2.1 km before regaining the Lynn Loop Trail. Altogether, this extension will nearly double your hike to 10.3 km but the going is no more difficult than the shorter option detailed above.

The End


Skunk Cabbage

Skunk Cabbage

Though not in themselves palatable, skunk cabbage leaves had a zillion uses around the aboriginal kitchen. The unusually large leaves were ideal for lining and covering containers, lining steam pits, making fruit leather and sun drying seafood. Bears are known to bung themselves up by ingesting copious quantities of mud just prior to settling in for that long winter nap. Come springtime they seek out the laxative properties of skunk cabbage to -- stand back -- flush the system.

Illustration by Manami Kimura