Of course the esoteric pursuit of bird watching can be undertaken in just about any corner of the province. There are, however, several major ornithological events that attract a broader, more common curiosity.

Woody Woodpecker: Spectacular migratory events aside, birding can be enjoyed just about anywhere. This industustrious Pileated Woodpecker was caught deconstructing a fir tree on Newcastle Island.   

British Columbia is an important stop on the migratory flyways of numerous species including black brant geese on Vancouver Island, snow geese, snowy owls and sandpipers in the Fraser River Delta and Boundary Bay and bald eagles to a number of coastal British Columbia rivers. These cyclical events attract photographers and naturalists from all over the world.

A mature bald eagle in Haida Gwaii.

For up-to-date information on birding phenomena such as the arrival of the snow geese or rare bird sightings contact:

Vancouver Bird Alert Hotline:

(604) 737-3074

Sponsors: Vancouver Natural History Society and Wildbirds Unlimited

The End


Puffball

Puffballs

Apart from being edible—and delicious at that—dried spores were used as diaper rash "talcum powder" by the First Nations of BC. Spores were also found to staunch bloodflow when placed on a wound. At one time the brownish spores were used as a photographic flash powder. A large puffball can contain as many as 7500 billion spores. If each of these spores were to grow to maturity the next generation would form a fungus colony some 800 times the size of the earth.

Illustration by Manami Kimura