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BC Car-Free:

Exploring Southwestern

British Columbia

Without a Car

by Brian Grover

  The entire 340 page outdoor guidebook BC Car-Free: Exploring Southwestern British Columbia Without a Car is now posted online for the benefit of all. For less than the price of a tank of gas, BC Car-Free will introduce you to the finest in outdoor recreation that coastal British Columbia has to offer. All excursions begin in Vancouver, British Columbia and can be undertaken without a car, using existing public transportation infrastructure. Topics include hiking, kayaking, backpacking, cycle touring, whale watching, horseback riding, birding, river rafting, canoeing and cave exploring. To begin exploring, look no further than the Table of Contents on your left.
 

Just the Facts...

  • 340 pages
  • 94 separate trips
  • 52 maps
  • 130 photos
  • 25 sidebar illustrations
 

12 activities including...

  • Hiking - 41 Trips
  • Backpacking - 10 Trips
  • Ocean Kayaking - 13 Trips
  • Cycle Touring - 10 Trips
  • River Rafting - 3 Rivers
  • Horseback Riding - 1 Location
  • Cave Exploring - 3 Caves
  • Canoeing - 1 Trip
  • Whale Watching - 3 Locations
  • Birding - 5 Species
  • Salmon Watching - 3 Locations
  • Getaways - 3 Trips

Warm weather causes toxic plankton to bloom all over the coast of British Columbia whether a month has an "R" in it or not. If you are not absolutely sure that the shellfish you are about to eat is safe then don’t eat it. Bivalve molluscs like oysters, clams and mussels are all susceptible to red tide. Butter clams are the very worst, retaining toxins for long periods of time. Cooking does not alter the toxicity of these filter feeders in any way.

If you are going to an area where shellfish harvesting might be possible then make it a habit to call the federal government’s online Red Tide advisory. As with so many  government services this one too is needlessly confusing. Where appropriate, I have included Fisheries Management Area numbers with each trip description. Armed with that information, navigating the Fisheries and Oceans Canada's online list of Bivalve Shellfish Contamination Closures is much simpler. On the same site there's a slow-loading map detailing closures as well.

The End

Notable Quotes

Grover's 340-page book is a wealth of information for the weekend warrior and outdoor enthusiast alike....

-- Scott Birke; Sea to Sky VOICE